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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
. controversial right-to-work measures will soon be the law of the land in michigan. republican governor rick snider signed the law despite wide protests at the capitol. the law will make it illegal for a union employee to pay union dues as a condition of their employment. >> let's explain that. just for half a second. then we'll go on. right to work, what does it mean? people ask me, what does it mean? it means unions can force somebody to pay them if they want to get a job in the state of michigan. >> well, what it means is, if you get a job, the union extracts money from your paycheck for the dues for union dues. >> well, yeah. >> automatically. >> automatically. >> you've got no choice. oh, you want to work here? well, you've got to pay us. >> right. >> what if i don't want to pay you? what if i don't want to support the candidates you support? what if they're the antithesis of my values? too bad. and so i've never understood this. >> governor snider says it was the unions who started the fight in the first place. by trying to add collective bargaining rights in the state's constitution.
, president obama toured the chrysler jefferson north assembly plant in detroit, michigan, july 30th, 2010. how did the workers get their job back two years later? uaw, the union that represents them in collective bargaining provided for arbitration. the arbiter sided with workers. chrysler's response, unfortunately the company was put in difficult position because the way the story was investigated and ultimately revealed to the public. these employees from jeff north have been off work more than two years and the time has come to put the situation behind us and put focus on quality products. the president back in detroit today with scheduled visit to the daimler detroit diesel plant in redford, michigan, a different one. martha: good old-fashioned investigative reporting on this one. caught on camera moments you have to see to believe. my favor when they chuck the bottle in the woods when done drinking with it. >> reporter: you really do. as attorney, understanding the arbitration process it is hard to understand how when you see what they did, they got their jobs back. take a look at th
with the organized labor movement, michigan, has approved legislation vastly limiting the power of unions in the state. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the passage of the right to work laws and the angry demonstrations inside and outside the state capital building. >> woodruff: then, we turn to protests in another part of the world, egypt, where supporters and opponents of president morsi staged rival rallies in cairo four days ahead of vote on a proposed constitution. >> suarez: next in our series of conversations about solving the fiscal crisis, gwen ifill talks with representative allyson schwartz, a democrat from pennsylvania. >> woodruff: we examine an almost $2 billion government settlement with british bank hsbc over charges of money laundering for the nation of iran and mexican drug cartels. >> suarez: jeffrey brown profiles chinese artist and dissident ai wei wei, whose work is on exhibit in the u.s. for the first time. >> if we can change ourselves, that means part of society will change. if more peopl
viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: michigan, a state considered a cradle of the union movement, today struck a blow against organized labor. the republican-dominated state legislature approved laws that deny unions the right to require membership in exchange for a job. more than 12,000 people gathered outside the state capitol in lansing to protest the move. inside, they chanted "shame on you!" at republican governor rick snyder. late today he signed the bill. for more, we're joined by micheline maynard, a contributor to forbes.com and former detroit bureau chief for the "new york times," and by bill ballenger, editor of "inside michigan politics." welcome to you both. mickey maynard. first, this has all happened very quickly. what precipitated this right now. >> there were two things that happened, judy. first of all in november there was a ballot proposal that unions floated that would have outlawed right-to-work. it would have put that into the state constitution. that proposal failed because it was proposed at the same time as a lot of constitutional amendments. people just
over the state. cutting deals. we are doing that in some respects. it is our race. how does michigan spent so much subsidy attracting -- michigan is not doing that well. you have some money but what about other things to invest in and take care of? we want to make our regulatory climate more transparent. we have a long way to go. we are open and ready to go. there is a lot of people who want to keep the regulation complicated or make it worse. it is -- this could be something, you have to fight and crush opposition to change regulations. it is not a paper exercise. it is a contact sport. you have to understand that. the world is like that. we look for things and wherever we can, will do it. it is very hard to cut people a tax break. we have been in the hole for 10 years. i think you have to cut and find more revenue. there are various ways to can do that. we are a high-cost state. america is a holocaust -- a high-cost country. that is why, that is the way the world this. we're 4% of the world. an aging 4% with an emerging from a powerful china and india and brazil and other countries
. speaker, very much. mr. speaker, as a representative from ohio, a state that borders michigan, i rise to stand in solidarity with the workers of michigan. many ohioans i represent actually drive to work in michigan. and due to the highhanded actions of michigan's governor and its legislature, they actually railroaded legislation through michigan with no hearings to take away the rights of michigan workers to fund the collective bargaining process that results in living wage workers' contracts. the workers of michigan are fighting to maintain their rights to a fair day's wage, for a fair day's work. i support their rights and the rights of every american to organize and negotiate by contract for proper pay and benefits, regardless of which state they live in. the rights of labor by contract are critical to growing our middle class as opposed to rights by happenchance that are always up for grabs where workers have no rights and live in fear of the future. michigan's republican ideologues passed so-called right to work legislation. let's be clear, the bill being pushed there should be c
? the presiding officer: the senator from michigan. ms. stabenow: thank you, mr. president. today i rise because middle-class families are counting on the house of representatives to do the right thing between now and the end of the year, which is just 19 days away for the house to pass the middle-class tax cuts that we sent them back in july. families need help. when we talk about fiscal cliff, the most important one is the -- what families are struggling with every day, and we only have 19 days until taxes on middle-class families go up by an average of $2,200 if the house of representatives doesn't act to make sure that 98% of the american public is protected from tax increases. as we know, we passed the middle-class tax cut act on july july 25. so far, the house has not acted. 19 days, they have 19 days until the end of this year in order to act. time is running out. country, a long-term plan for fiscal solvency and for our economy. and by the way, we'll never get out of debt with close to 12 million people out of work, so we better be focused on jobs and the economy as i am each and every d
for one of the busiest days of the year. elsewhere, parts of wisconsin, iowa, and michigan dug out from more than a foot of snow. the storm was blamed for at least nine deaths in half a dozen states. the day that some pegged as the "end of the world" came and went without incident. the focus on december 21, 2012, was said to be based on projections in an ancient mayan calendar. in mexico, tourists and new age spiritualists gathered to greet the day at mayan archaeological sites. and thousands converged on stonehenge in england for an "end of the world" party coinciding with the winter solstice. it may not be doomsday, but americans are feeling less hopeful about the future. the university of michigan's consumer confidence index fell this month to the lowest point since july. and wall street gave ground today on worries about the lack of a budget deal in washington. the dow jones industrial average lost almost 121 points to close near 13,190. the nasdaq fell 29 points to close at 3,021. for the week, the dow gained about half a percent; the nasdaq rose 1.7%. those are some of the day's m
. the university of michigan's consumer confidence index fell this month to the lowest point since july. and wall street gave ground today on worries about the lack of a budget deal in washington. the dow jones industrial average lost almost 121 points to close near 13,190. the nasdaq fell 29 points to close at 3,021. for the week, the dow gained about half a percent; the nasdaq rose 1.7%. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: and we return to the aftermath of the shootings in newtown, connecticut, a week ago today. ray suarez begins our coverage of the latest developments. >> suarez: a cold rain fell this morning in newtown, connecticut, as townspeople and officials gathered at city hall for a moment of silence. at 9:30, a bell rang 26 times, once for each of the 20 children and six adults killed one week ago at sandy hook elementary school. mourners also gathered again at funerals and at makeshift memorials. >> i feel as though the first few days after this happened was really a feeling of numbness and shock. but now that's lifting a little bit and the reali
, it's a large manufacturing state. we've got a big obstacle in the way with lake michigan to get product to the east coast. so i recognize there's need for investment. but i often hear from my constituents the concern of the government, of the federal government picking regions of the country to win and lose in the economic battles that take place between states. in other words, if we invest a lot of money in the northeast quarter's federal taxpayer or a lot of money in california, the fax payer in -- taxpayer in wisconsin is wondering are we just making those states more competitive to compete against wisconsin manufacturing? could you talk a little bit about how the whole thing plays together and what the answer should be? >> first of all, i know you know this, but you all were in the ball game. >> yeah. i'm not making the statement on -- >> i know you're not. i'm saying if you feel your state is disadvantaged, it's not because of us. we wanted to make investments, we were ready to make investments. >> let's take it from montana. let's just take it from a different region becau
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

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